Monday, August 22, 2016

Respect

My Life Group lesson for August 21, 2016, using Lifeway's "Explore the Bible" commentary as a guide, with an assist from John McClendon and Love Worth Finding ...

FIRST THOUGHTS

American gold medal-winning swimmer Ryan Lochte, ak.a. the Real Swim Shady, made some bad decisions this week. First, he and three of his swimming bros acted dumbly at a gas station in Rio, had "security" guards point guns at them and demand money to leave. Then Lochte came up with a tale of being robbed by fake cops and lied to his mom about having a gun cocked at his head, which led to a feeding frenzy by the media and apologies from the United State Olympic Committee to Brazil.

Ryan and the other swimmers obviously lost sight of how their actions make them look and how they represent the United States.

Similarly, when we choose a path outside of God’s will, we lose sight of how our actions represent Christianity and affect the spread of the Gospel.

Before we make a decision that could affect the rest of our lives, we need to:

--- Trust in God
--- Wait on Him
--- Pray for His will
--- Watch Him work

UNDERSTAND THE CONTEXT
1 Samuel 24:1-22; 26:1-25

*** We continue our study of David and Saul.

*** From the time David was anointed and throughout his adult life, he's lived in fear of King Saul.

*** Even when David had a chance to kill Saul in a cave in 1 Samuel 24, end the chase and take the throne, David remained loyal to the man chosen as king by the people and the Lord.

*** In chapter 26 David has another chance to kill Saul.

OPPORTUNITY KNOCKS (1 SAM. 26:7-8)

7 That night, David and Abishai came to the troops, and Saul was lying there asleep in the inner circle of the camp with his spear stuck in the ground by his head. Abner and the troops were lying around him. 8 Then Abishai said to David, “Today God has handed your enemy over to you. Let me thrust the spear through him into the ground just once. I won’t have to strike him twice!”

*** Listen! That’s David’s music!

--- Now a fugitive on the run, David had an opportunity to kill Saul but refused to take the easy way out.

(For WWE fans, it was as if God had distracted the ref in a wrestling match so that David could surprise Saul and smack him with a chair.)

--- David and his merry men had been pursued by Saul. They were outnumbered, but they knew the terrain and had the advantage of surprise.

--- Rather than flee the area or inflict an attack, David did something very risky. He tiptoed into Saul's camp as the army slept.

--- David asked two men to go with him, and while one didn't, Abishai did volunteer to go with David.

*** Finish him!

--- On the surface, it appeared that God had handed Saul right into David’s hands.

--- When David and Abishai came across the sleeping king, Abishai did what you'd expect, he eagerly volunteered to end the conflict once and for all.

(Think of the U.S. troops who would gladly be the one to take down Osama bin Laden or Saddam Hussein.)

--- Abishai could make it easy for everyone. With Saul dead David would be king, David wouldn't be blamed for killing him.

--- How often do we hear, “When God closes a door He opens a window?”

--- To Abishai this was a sign from God, so obviously God intended for Saul to be killed.

--- Similarly, David could have thought, “If God wants me to be king, and He does, and God has placed Saul in my hands, and He has, then obviously God wants me to kill him.”

--- However, an opportunity does not always mean an open door to act.

*** Question - What are the dangers of equating an open door with God’s will? How does one know the difference between a true open door and a test disguised as an open door?

David knew God’s Word and God’s ways, so he was able to discern the truth in this opportunity.

Imagine if you had a chance to take out a co-worker to get that promotion you want. Does that make it OK?

GODLY RESPECT (1 SAM. 26:9-12)

9 But David said to Abishai, “Don’t destroy him, for who can lift a hand against the LORD’s anointed and be blameless?” 10 David added, “As the LORD lives, the LORD will certainly strike him down: either his day will come and he will die, or he will go into battle and perish. 11 However, because of the LORD, I will never lift my hand against the LORD’s anointed. Instead, take the spear and the water jug by his head, and let’s go.” 12 So David took the spear and the water jug by Saul’s head, and they went their way. No one saw them, no one knew, and no one woke up; they all remained asleep because a deep sleep from the LORD came over them.

*** Out, out, darn spot!

--- Assassinating Saul would have left David with blood on his hands, like Lady Macbeth who couldn’t wash out the guilt.

--- Instead of taking advantage of a sweet situation, David continued to be loyal to Saul as God’s chosen leader of Israel.

--- He also knew that if Abishai did the killing it wouldn’t rationalize the act as a will of God.

*** Leave it to God.

--- He trusted God, leaving the future in His hands. Even if Saul was undeserving of such respect, his position as God’s anointed was deserving of respect.

--- David also knew that God would come through on His promise to make him king and in His own time.

--- David didn’t know how Saul would finally die, but not long before this in chapter 25 David saw how God dealt with Nabal.

--- David would receive the crown as a gift from God, he would not seize it by force.

--- David's survival and ultimate success were divinely directed.

*** Saul takes Supernatural Sleep Time Tea.

--- It seems impossible that David and Abishai could walk around Saul’s camp and not one of the 3,000 men was a light sleeper.

--- However, we see in verse 12 that God was working in this. God put the soldiers in a deep sleep.

--- On his way out David grabbed Saul’s beloved spear (which we’ve seen him hold and throw several times) and his water jug to prove to Saul that he could have taken him out if he so chose.

--- By taking these two items he was showing that he held Saul's life in his hands. His spear represented military power, and water was a precious commodity traveling through the wilderness.

*** Question - Respect is often seen as something that must be earned. David showed respect to someone who didn’t show respect to him. Why is it hard to respect people who disrespect us? Why should we?

REMORSE (1 SAM. 26:21-25)

21 Saul responded, “I have sinned. Come back, my son David, I will never harm you again because today you considered my life precious. I have been a fool! I’ve committed a grave error.” 22 David answered, “Here is the king’s spear; have one of the young men come over and get it. 23 May the LORD repay every man for his righteousness and his loyalty. I wasn’t willing to lift my hand against the LORD’s anointed, even though the LORD handed you over to me today. 24 Just as I considered your life valuable today, so may the LORD consider my life valuable and rescue me from all trouble.” 25 Saul said to him, “You are blessed, my son David. You will certainly do great things and will also prevail.” Then David went on his way, and Saul returned home.

*** Catch Me If You Can!

--- Out of the camp, David crossed a gorge separating his camp from Saul's.

--- David called out to alert the army to his presence, and showed the spear and water jug to prove that he'd been right in the middle of them.

--- It also proved that if not for David's mercy and sense of honor, he could have killed Saul but he had no desire to do that.

--- David even returns Saul’s spear, which was a sign of Saul’s royal power. If he kept it then he might look like he’s seeking the throne and to humiliate the king.

--- Verses 23 and 24 make it clear that David was appealing to God to be the ultimate judge in this trial. But would Saul continue to be judge, jury and executioner?

*** Sinner, sinner, chicken dinner.

--- After twice being told about his chances of death at the hands of David, Saul acts regretful and repentant.

--- But was this genuine repentance?

--- The first time David spared Saul's life - in the cave - Saul similarly expressed remorse. Of course, it didn't stick.

--- Here's what he said, in 1 Samuel 24:17-21 - “You are more righteous than I,” he said. “You have treated me well, but I have treated you badly. You have just now told me about the good you did to me; the LORD delivered me into your hands, but you did not kill me. When a man finds his enemy, does he let him get away unharmed? May the LORD reward you well for the way you treated me today. I know that you will surely be king and that the kingdom of Israel will be established in your hands. Now swear to me by the LORD that you will not kill off my descendants or wipe out my name from my father’s family.”

*** David could certainly doubt Saul’s sincerity.

--- Notice that David didn’t take the spear and jug back to Saul himself. When you’re dealing with someone who has constantly rebelled against God, we are cautious.

--- Saul sounds more like Pharaoh in Exodus 10:16-17, when he said he sinned against Yahweh and asked for relief from the plagues. After letting Israel go, he went after them again.

--- Saul was morally degenerate and like the pharaoh, unable to be trusted.

--- Showing remorse isn’t the same as being genuinely repentant.

--- Saul goes back home, but in chapter 27 it wasn't until David flees to Philistine territory that the scripture says Saul finally “no longer searched for him.”

--- Galatians 6:7 says we’ll reap what we sow, and Saul would find that out soon enough.

--- David, meanwhile, showed a more forgiving heart, closer to how we’re supposed to live, “Just as the Lord has forgiven you, so you must also forgive” (Col. 3:13; see also Eph. 4:32).

REVIEW AND TAKE-AWAY POINTS

Adrian Rogers once said, when you fly in a plane, does the law of gravity no longer exist?

Of course it’s there.

But the law of aerodynamics is even greater.

It’s the same in our Christian walk. When we get right with God, the law of sin and death are still there. But we have a new law, a life in Jesus Christ that frees us from sin and death.

David’s obedience may have cost him. He could have had the throne as a much younger man. But his focus wasn’t on Saul but on God.

When Peter walked on water to meet Jesus, he let his eyes wander and began to sink. If we take our eyes off Jesus and into our own hands it creates more pain in the long run.

*** (1) Humility and respect are related. If you humble yourself before others you will treat others as important as God sees them.

*** (2) What open doors are in front of you? Seek God’s counsel to make sure which ones are within God’s will.

*** (3) When we wait on God and follow His ways instead of our own, we see what God can do.

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